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How Much Does It Cost To Install A New Toilet?

Toilet Replacement Prices

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As one of the most coveted seats in the house, you probably don’t need to be sold on the merits of a toilet. Many homeowners, however, are surprised by just how many options there are when it comes time to install a new toilet. This buying guide takes a look at the different types of toilets and how much you can expect to pay for toilet replacement.

Toilet Options

Compare the following toilet types to find one that best suits your needs:

One-Piece vs. Two-Piece Toilet

In a one-piece toilet, the bowl and the tank are combined in a single unit. A two-piece toilet, as the name implies, has a separate bowl and tank that are assembled at the time of installation. One-piece toilets are easier to clean and typically have more of a low-profile design, while two-piece toilets are less expensive and simpler to relocate.

Flushing Style

Think all toilets flush the same way? As a matter of fact, there are three ways that toilets send water down the pipes.

The first and most common is a gravity-flush toilet, which is the type you probably have installed currently. These toilets are the most inexpensive and having few mechanical parts, are simple to repair.

A second option, the pressure-assist toilet, uses compressed air for a more powerful flush. Pressure-assist toilets are typical in commercial buildings and while quite loud, they produce a cleaner bowl.

For the latest in flush technology, opt for a vacuum-assist toilet. This toilet design has a stronger flush than a gravity-flush (though not as strong as a pressure-assist) but only costs slightly more than gravity models.

Low-Flow Toilets

If you have an older home with outdated toilets, you can save money on your water bills by installing low-flow (or low-flush) toilets. Since 1992 the U.S. government has mandated the use of toilets that consume no more than 1.6 gallons of water per flush. But some toilets utilize even less water each time the handle is lowered. So-called high efficiency toilets (HETs) only use 1.28 gallons per flush (look for the EPA’s “WaterSense” label). There are also dual-flush models that use about 0.8 gallons for liquid waste and 1.6 gallons for solid waste.

Toilet Average Costs

The actual cost of a toilet depends on the model and options selected, your location, whether the floor around the old toilet requires water-damage repairs, and other factors.

  • It’s possible to pick up a toilet for under $100 and if you’re so inclined, there are also models that cost up to $4,000 or more (like this sophisticated Japanese unit that has sensors, a heated seat, and self-cleaning features).
  • For a typical gravity-flush toilet you’ll pay $100 to $300.
  • Pressure-assist and vacuum assist toilets cost $250 to $750 or more.
  • Dual-flush toilets cost $200 to $500.
  • The cost to install a toilet should be $75 to $150, but could be more if extensive labor is required.

Author: Brian Eckert